Re: In car communication

RogueLeader wrote:
Guildenstern wrote:
RogueLeader wrote:

Yeah we went with privacy codes after I had to spend half an hour in the car at NJMP years ago listening to some terrified person  who had such a death grip on the wheel he kept the radio keyed the whole time while going "ohmigod ohmigod ohmigod ohmigod holyshit holyshit holyshit imgonnadie imgonnadie imgonnadie"

How does a privacy code fix a guy stuck mic on a channel? He's still broadcasting.

There is no way from the drivers seat to turn the radio off.  With privacy channels at least I don't have to hear him.

You should mount your radio somewhere else then.  We've never had to use it but many radios, ours included, have an easy-enough-to-change-while-driving Ch. 1 / Ch. 2 button that you can pre-program.  If our driver decides the channel we're on is too crowded or someone gets a stuck mic he can call in or signal as he goes by to switch channels.

Electric Mayhem Racing

Re: In car communication

mgavro wrote:

We've never had to use it but many radios, ours included, have an easy-enough-to-change-while-driving Ch. 1 / Ch. 2 button that you can pre-program.

If you happen to use the Boefeng radios the "A/B" channel selector button is tiny, and there't no way I could ever feel it with gloves on.

Captain
Team Super Westerfield Bros.
'93 Acura Integra - No VTEC Yo!

Re: In car communication

Best advise you'll ever get in a radio thread, don't happen to use Baofengs. Aspire to at least mediocrity.

Mistake By The Lake Racing (MBTL)
88 Thunderbird "THUNDERBIRDS ARE GO!"
A&D: 2014 Sebrings at Sebring (NSF), 2014 NJMP2 Jurassic Park (SpeedyCop), 2012 Summit Point J30 (PiNuts)
2018 Route Sucky-Suck Rally Miata.

Re: In car communication

rb92673 wrote:

You could get your HAM license and get off the FRS/GMRS bands.  Buy a book, read book, take test for $10 at local club.

And replace $600 worth of FRS/GMRS radios, car kit, etc.  Its not a bad idea, but financially I'm too invested and this setup basically works fine.

Guildenstern wrote:

Right, but unless you change channels the radio is useless and you wouldnt’t know why,

The situation I described happened in 2011 (at Lemons first Northeast race that was not at the dinky Stafford Springs) and hasn't happened since, so I'm not totally concerned about it anymore, just wanted to relate a funny story to the situation.

VKZ24 wrote:
RogueLeader wrote:

There is no way from the drivers seat to turn the radio off.

I purposely mounted our radio box just to the right of the shifter so the driver could adjust the volume on ours.  I've  had an occasion where something happened to my ear buds resulting in a loud, high-pitched squeal in my ears, so I simply reached down and turned the radio off.

Never had that issue, but I moved the radio next to the window as it works noticeably better there, unfortunately out of reach of the driver.

Sir Thomas Crapper wrote:

That would be me, every race.

One time, the broadcast button got stuck in transmit, while I was guest driving.  The reports back after my stint were pretty funny.  I talk to myself alot...

I KNEW it sounded like you smile lol!

Tom Lomino - Proud to be a 21x Lemons Loser, 3x Class B, and 1x IOE Winner!
Craptain, Team Farfrumwinnin - 1995 Volkswagen Golf #14
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Re: In car communication

RogueLeader wrote:
rb92673 wrote:

You could get your HAM license and get off the FRS/GMRS bands.  Buy a book, read book, take test for $10 at local club.

And replace $600 worth of FRS/GMRS radios, car kit, etc.  Its not a bad idea, but financially I'm too invested and this setup basically works fine.

A lot of people on this thread mentioned Baofengs which are perfectly legal for HAM use, but are not FCC certified or legal for FRS/GMRS.  The FCC would only know if someone complained and tracked you down.  Who has time for that? 

I only mentioned because getting a HAM license is super easy and you have a ton more wavelength, frequencies and power levels to choose from.

Re: In car communication

rb92673 wrote:

I only mentioned because getting a HAM license is super easy and you have a ton more wavelength, frequencies and power levels to choose from.

Wouldn't everyone broadcasting on the HAM frequencies need a HAM license?  I have enough trouble getting drivers to pay, let alone getting HAM licenses.

Apparently my name is really "Craigers".  Who knew?
We might be yellow, but at least we are slow
I'm a WINNER!

Re: In car communication

The answer is still flag semaphore.

Re: In car communication

OnkelUdo wrote:

The answer is still flag semaphore.

Or just a flag.

That guy

Re: In car communication

The only flag semaphore that matters:
http://floatingimpressions.com.au/images/splice%20the%20mainbrace%20flags.JPG

Mistake By The Lake Racing (MBTL)
88 Thunderbird "THUNDERBIRDS ARE GO!"
A&D: 2014 Sebrings at Sebring (NSF), 2014 NJMP2 Jurassic Park (SpeedyCop), 2012 Summit Point J30 (PiNuts)
2018 Route Sucky-Suck Rally Miata.

Re: In car communication

solman244 wrote:
rb92673 wrote:

I only mentioned because getting a HAM license is super easy and you have a ton more wavelength, frequencies and power levels to choose from.

Wouldn't everyone broadcasting on the HAM frequencies need a HAM license?  I have enough trouble getting drivers to pay, let alone getting HAM licenses.

Yes.  Everyone on GMRS too, unless you are family.

Re: In car communication

solman244 wrote:
rb92673 wrote:

I only mentioned because getting a HAM license is super easy and you have a ton more wavelength, frequencies and power levels to choose from.

Wouldn't everyone broadcasting on the HAM frequencies need a HAM license?  I have enough trouble getting drivers to pay, let alone getting HAM licenses.

Theres that too...

Tom Lomino - Proud to be a 21x Lemons Loser, 3x Class B, and 1x IOE Winner!
Craptain, Team Farfrumwinnin - 1995 Volkswagen Golf #14
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Re: In car communication

Troy wrote:
Brett85p wrote:
Troy wrote:

Brett,

What kind of problems are you having?

Troy

Sounded ok in pits, garbled on track, just a lot of noise not able to make out what was being said.

We mirrored Aaron and Jerry's set up which seems to work fine.

Sounds like a reception problem.

What are you using for an antenna?

If you have a roof antenna, the NMO cable needs to ground to metal. Make sure you have the correct adapter too, typically some type of BNC adapter.

This is the antenna I have, it just connects directly to the handset. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XQ … &psc=1

Apocalyptic Racing - Occupy Pit Lane racing
Racing the "Toylet" Toyota Celica powered by Chevrolet Ecotec.
16x Loser with the Celica. 5 times loser in other fine machines

Re: In car communication

Has anyone tried to take something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/Midland-Consumer … dpSrc=srch

And adapt an already existing car kit to it?  For example I have a midland adapter for my ptt imsa car kit, I'd be happy to cut it up to make it work with this (I use Motorolas now), but I don't even know where to start or if it would even work.

Tom Lomino - Proud to be a 21x Lemons Loser, 3x Class B, and 1x IOE Winner!
Craptain, Team Farfrumwinnin - 1995 Volkswagen Golf #14
Click here to "Like" us on Facebook   Click here for our Youtube Videos
Lifetime Achievement (of hoplessness) Award Winners

Re: In car communication

RogueLeader wrote:

Has anyone tried to take something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/Midland-Consumer … dpSrc=srch

And adapt an already existing car kit to it?  For example I have a midland adapter for my ptt imsa car kit, I'd be happy to cut it up to make it work with this (I use Motorolas now), but I don't even know where to start or if it would even work.


No reason it wouldn't. You just need the pinout so you can wire in the right parts. But you're just swapping from the handheld to a headset and PPT. From my experience modifying Midland helmet kits, working with that will suck because of the typical wire they used (similar to headphone wire), so if you can find a pinout and then a new solder connector that matches the base unit, it will be easier to start there rather then cut up and add to the existing chord.

20+ Time Loser FutilityMotorsport
Turbo Dodge Powered E36 Build
2008 Saab 9-5Aero Wagon
Retired - 1989 Dodge Daytona Shelby 2011-2015 "Lifetime Award for Lack of Achievement" IOE, 3X I got screwed, Organizer's Choice

Re: In car communication

TheEngineer wrote:
RogueLeader wrote:

Has anyone tried to take something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/Midland-Consumer … dpSrc=srch

And adapt an already existing car kit to it?  For example I have a midland adapter for my ptt imsa car kit, I'd be happy to cut it up to make it work with this (I use Motorolas now), but I don't even know where to start or if it would even work.


No reason it wouldn't. You just need the pinout so you can wire in the right parts. But you're just swapping from the handheld to a headset and PPT. From my experience modifying Midland helmet kits, working with that will suck because of the typical wire they used (similar to headphone wire), so if you can find a pinout and then a new solder connector that matches the base unit, it will be easier to start there rather then cut up and add to the existing chord.

My Midland adapter is not made by Midland but the company that makes the kit, so splicing in the plug to that adapter may be a good solution.  Now to find the wiring and pinout of both.......

Tom Lomino - Proud to be a 21x Lemons Loser, 3x Class B, and 1x IOE Winner!
Craptain, Team Farfrumwinnin - 1995 Volkswagen Golf #14
Click here to "Like" us on Facebook   Click here for our Youtube Videos
Lifetime Achievement (of hoplessness) Award Winners

Re: In car communication

We did it. it's easily doable once you have the diagram and the tools for the RJ jack.

Mistake By The Lake Racing (MBTL)
88 Thunderbird "THUNDERBIRDS ARE GO!"
A&D: 2014 Sebrings at Sebring (NSF), 2014 NJMP2 Jurassic Park (SpeedyCop), 2012 Summit Point J30 (PiNuts)
2018 Route Sucky-Suck Rally Miata.

Re: In car communication

Brett85p wrote:
Troy wrote:
Brett85p wrote:

Sounded ok in pits, garbled on track, just a lot of noise not able to make out what was being said.

We mirrored Aaron and Jerry's set up which seems to work fine.

Sounds like a reception problem.

What are you using for an antenna?

If you have a roof antenna, the NMO cable needs to ground to metal. Make sure you have the correct adapter too, typically some type of BNC adapter.

This is the antenna I have, it just connects directly to the handset. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XQ … &psc=1

I don't have any experience with the antenna but a magnetic mount should not need the ground to the car a hole mount would need.

It also says it's dual band with a broad range:
Dual-Band VHF & UHF (137-174, 400-520 MHz)

I doubt it can really cover all that range well and probably has a "sweet spot" more in the middle.

We use this Laird 3dB Gain UHF antenna on my car. I have no idea if the 3dB really helps us. I bought it because it looked nicer than a little 6" wire whip. They come in various band splits like 430-450, 450-470 typically about a 20 MHz range.

https://www.amazon.com/Laird-ETRAB4303- … ntenna+uhf

Most of the Tetanus fleet just has a simple wire whip.
https://www.amazon.com/Laird-450-470MHz … ntenna+uhf

To further confuse you guys, we also use Motorola and Baofeng radios at the same time. I can't tell a difference in radio or antenna performance.

I am subscribed to this topic but have not gotten a message showing new activity in a long time and apologize for the late reply.

Troy

#35 LRE
1973 Datsun 240Z

Re: In car communication

RogueLeader wrote:
TheEngineer wrote:
RogueLeader wrote:

Has anyone tried to take something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/Midland-Consumer … dpSrc=srch

And adapt an already existing car kit to it?  For example I have a midland adapter for my ptt imsa car kit, I'd be happy to cut it up to make it work with this (I use Motorolas now), but I don't even know where to start or if it would even work.


No reason it wouldn't. You just need the pinout so you can wire in the right parts. But you're just swapping from the handheld to a headset and PPT. From my experience modifying Midland helmet kits, working with that will suck because of the typical wire they used (similar to headphone wire), so if you can find a pinout and then a new solder connector that matches the base unit, it will be easier to start there rather then cut up and add to the existing chord.

My Midland adapter is not made by Midland but the company that makes the kit, so splicing in the plug to that adapter may be a good solution.  Now to find the wiring and pinout of both.......

I made a NASCAR harness for a radio like that, I do not recall the USB on the front. There is only Mic Input and PTT on the front jack like almost ALL mobile radios. In order to get receive audio you have to internally modify the radio.

If someone knows of a mobile radio, preferably a Kenwood with speaker/receive audio on the front jack I'd like to know.

Additionally, putting a high power radio in the car increases it's transmit range. You'll hear it in the pits but the pits transmission may not make it back to the car.

Troy

#35 LRE
1973 Datsun 240Z

Re: In car communication

You can also usually pull Rx audio off the “external speaker” jack on the back of a mobile. We’re just buttoning up a mod of your harness for that today on an iComm unit.

And if one just happens to have another unit in the tow vehicle or another mobile application pit side, well....

Mistake By The Lake Racing (MBTL)
88 Thunderbird "THUNDERBIRDS ARE GO!"
A&D: 2014 Sebrings at Sebring (NSF), 2014 NJMP2 Jurassic Park (SpeedyCop), 2012 Summit Point J30 (PiNuts)
2018 Route Sucky-Suck Rally Miata.

Re: In car communication

Guildenstern wrote:

You can also usually pull Rx audio off the “external speaker” jack on the back of a mobile. We’re just buttoning up a mod of your harness for that today on an iComm unit.

And if one just happens to have another unit in the tow vehicle or another mobile application pit side, well....

The Midland in question has no rear speaker out.

Troy

#35 LRE
1973 Datsun 240Z

Re: In car communication

Troy wrote:
RogueLeader wrote:
TheEngineer wrote:

No reason it wouldn't. You just need the pinout so you can wire in the right parts. But you're just swapping from the handheld to a headset and PPT. From my experience modifying Midland helmet kits, working with that will suck because of the typical wire they used (similar to headphone wire), so if you can find a pinout and then a new solder connector that matches the base unit, it will be easier to start there rather then cut up and add to the existing chord.

My Midland adapter is not made by Midland but the company that makes the kit, so splicing in the plug to that adapter may be a good solution.  Now to find the wiring and pinout of both.......

I made a NASCAR harness for a radio like that, I do not recall the USB on the front. There is only Mic Input and PTT on the front jack like almost ALL mobile radios. In order to get receive audio you have to internally modify the radio.

If someone knows of a mobile radio, preferably a Kenwood with speaker/receive audio on the front jack I'd like to know.

Additionally, putting a high power radio in the car increases it's transmit range. You'll hear it in the pits but the pits transmission may not make it back to the car.

That front USB is apparently just for use as an external device charger, not anything else. 

And yeah I figured if I mount one in the car and have someone in the garage with one both will transmit solidly and any other team members with a radio will hear it no matter where they are.

Tom Lomino - Proud to be a 21x Lemons Loser, 3x Class B, and 1x IOE Winner!
Craptain, Team Farfrumwinnin - 1995 Volkswagen Golf #14
Click here to "Like" us on Facebook   Click here for our Youtube Videos
Lifetime Achievement (of hoplessness) Award Winners

Re: In car communication

This is why you shouldn't use Baofengs, lol: https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/DA-18-801A1.pdf

"THE WONDERMENT CONSORTIUM"
Nothing's for certain, it could always go wrong. Come in when it's raining, go on out when it's gone.

Re: In car communication

derekste wrote:

This is why you shouldn't use Baofengs, lol: https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/DA-18-801A1.pdf


According to that document, the 400-520 MHz range is legal, and mine are being operated in that range, so I'm not concerned.

Captain
Team Super Westerfield Bros.
'93 Acura Integra - No VTEC Yo!

74 (edited by billy bee 2018-08-09 10:49 AM)

Re: In car communication

Fishah wrote:
TeamLemon-aid wrote:

Uhhh.... what?

I usually agree with you, but you need radios.  You just do.  If you ran with us a weekend you'd get it. 

Fishah wrote:

15 races and never felt the need for radios.

They're a nice-to-have, at best.

If you say so smile I only need to know when my stint is over and I get that from a kitchen timer.

The only reason I could see it being a nessecity is trying to manage a gap to another competitor in the closing stages, but that's not a thing for me.

With that said, I'd be happy to drive for you for a weekend in an attention to understand smile

I think the distinction is simple: if you want to be competitive, radios can make a huge difference--feeding information to the driver, prepping for stops, discussing car problems, discussing strategy, like pitting on a full-course yellow rather than running a pre-determined length of time. Some series require them so the stewards can get in touch with the driver, if necessary. You know, like if flames are shooting out from under the car.

If you are not interested in being competitive, then radios are completely optional.

I get (finally) that crapcan racing is focused on fun, but I think there can be a healthy balance of fun and competition. For that matter, for some of us the competition IS what's fun about Lemons. Some guys turn on the fun after the track is cold. Other's while it is still hot. I like to have fun all the time, and, for me, that means being somewhat competitive.

bb

75 (edited by VKZ24 2018-08-09 10:55 AM)

Re: In car communication

billy bee wrote:

if you want to be competitive, radios can make a huge difference--feeding information to the driver, prepping for stops, discussing car problems, discussing strategy, like pitting on a full-course yellow rather than running a pre-determined length of time.

While I agree with you, I can't remember the last time I saw a FCY during one of my stints.  Maybe us boys (and girls) on the right coast drive better (cleaner) than you guys on the left coast? wink   Worthy of note, our car counts are usually a lot lower as well.

Seriously, I can think of many times where I would have welcomed a FCY, just to take a break for a few minutes, but we rarely see them these days, which I guess is actually  a good thing.

To the point of this thread, it really sucks when we have radio problems, so we're a big fan of having ours working.

Captain
Team Super Westerfield Bros.
'93 Acura Integra - No VTEC Yo!